arugula

Why do I love October? Rhode Island greenings and Northern Spys, my two favorite pie apples, are easy to find. Plus Cranberry Bob Lesnikoski's picture-perfect cranberries are back in stores after their nine-month hiatus. Nick's Own Ginger Cider is there too. But this localvore succumbs to a great big, out-of-state weakness at this time of year. Red, round and versatile California pomegranates are back in the produce aisle.  I don't feel too guilty though. Like coffee, tea, Ceylon cinnamon and Aleppo pepper, pomegranates are a necessity, at least in my kitchen. They're just too versatile, too delicious and too pretty to pass up. Pull one open and pick out the glistening seeds as a last-...
It was gray and drizzling in Woodstock, Vermont, last Sunday, but the weather didn't diminish the festivities for the 128 people who gathered just off the Green, under the Middle Covered Bridge, to celebrate a weekend spent hand-building tables and feasting on a lunch made from locally grown foods. Bagpiper Tim Cummings blew up a stately march to welcome diners who took their places around the tables, which were hand-built that weekend by 17 individuals and families who participated in the Naked Table Project sponsored by ShackletonThomas. The Naked Table was conceived by well-known furniture maker Charlie Shackleton last year. Shackleton had a vision of people hand-building a table from...
from the FarmPlate Kitchen Consider making slightly over-sized sliders so they can't slip through the rungs on your grill rack. These are great with Cowboy Ketchup, which you can now find at City Market in Burlington. 1 tablespoon olive oil, plus more for brushing 2 large sweet onions, thinly sliced 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste Pinch of dried thyme 1½ pounds lean ground lamb (try Kind Horn Farm or check out the selection at Middlebury Natural Foods Co-op) 2 tablespoons chopped Kalamata olives ¼ cup crumbled blue cheese (we love Jasper Hill's Bayley Hazen Blue) 8 to 12 fresh-baked slider buns, split A handful or two of arugula leaves Heat the...
English has got to be a tough language for the non-native speaker. Take the word "slider" for instance. It can mean a runner rounding third determined to break the tie. An Olympic slider rides a skeleton down a mountain. The Slider is an almost-forgotten T Rex album. In the past five years, a new slider has joined the etymological mash-up. Sliders are turning up on restaurant menus all over the place. They're two- or three-bite burgers than pack some serious flavor heat. Sirloin sliders are probably the most common, but pork, lamb and even chicken sliders show up fairly frequently. We like sliders because they give you lots of room for creativity. You can tuck a surprise bit of cheese into...
from the FarmPlate Kitchen  Arugula and oranges combine to make this salad a nutrition powerhouse. It is an excellent source of vitamins A, folate, C and K, and a good source of minerals including calcium, potassium and magnesium. Vermont Herb & Salad Company's baby arugula can be found at Price Chopper, Rutland Area Food Co-op, Fresh Market in Burlington as well as many East Coast Trader Joe's. 2 large navel oranges12 ounces fresh arugula 2 scallions, thinly sliced ¼ cup pine nuts or sunflower seeds 2 tablespoons bitter orange marmalade 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons olive oil Salt and freshly ground black pepper Working over a bowl to catch the juice, remove the...
It's May and it's Vermont. The dribs and drabs of snow left over from Mother's Day have finally disappeared from everywhere but the highest elevations. It's time to get something, anything in the ground. It's still too early for beans and tomato starts will have to wait until Memorial Day. But there's one plant whose seeds almost blast off even in cold soil, and that plant is arugula. The English call it rocket, a perfect name for this cool-season salad green that grows at a rate approaching lightspeed. The plants are often ready to harvest as early as four weeks after seeding. If left to set flowers and seedpods, arugula will easily self-seed. It's unstoppable. Arugula may look like baby...
from the FarmPlate Kitchen 3 ounces diced country ham, pancetta or Vermont smoked ham (about ½ cup) 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 tablespoons dry vermouth or white wine 16 ounces fresh fettuccine, such as Pastabilities Traditional or Lemon Parsley 2 cups shelled fresh peas 2 big handfuls baby arugula ¼ cup Vermont Creamery crème fraîche Freshly ground black pepper Freshly grated Parmesan cheese for serving Chopped fresh parsley for serving In a skillet set over medium-high heat, brown the ham or pancetta in the olive oil. Pour in the vermouth or wine and cook for another minute. Turn off the heat. Cook the fettuccine in a large pot of boiling water. When the pasta is nearly done (after 2 or 3...
While yesterday's snowfall reminded me that it was still April and I was definitely back in Vermont, it's springtime in my kitchen. I've just returned from North Carolina with a cooler full of Currituck May peas. The humus-rich soils and gentle coastal climate of Currituck County provide ideal growing conditions for English peas. From now until mid-May, produce markets and farm stands alomg the NC 158 corridor leading to the Outer Banks will all have May peas for sale. On my drive north, I knew that Grandy Greenhouse in Grandy, North Carolina, had an old-fashioned pea/bean shelling machine so I stopped and stocked up. The produce manager was sweeping up stray pods after a busy shelling...
There's an awfully good chance you'll be in shirtsleeves while shopping for the ingredients for this Sunday's Easter feast. With temperatures forecast in the 70s, warm sunny thoughts and flavors will be on everyone's mind. Even if you're planning on roasting a succulent Vermont leg of lamb or a delicious ham, you might want to include a vegetarian entrée on the menu. Hortapita is a traditional Greek savory pie made with wild greens gathered in the springtime that's often part of a Greek Easter meal. While you can't go foraging on a Vermont hillside just yet, you can find tender local greens at area co-ops and farmers' markets (Middlebury, Montpelier and Rutland's farmers' markets will be...
from the FarmPlate Kitchen 1 tablespoon olive oil 3 links Vermont Smoke and Cure Turkey-Sun Dried Tomato Sausage or other low-fat sausage, sliced 1 large onion, chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 carrots, peeled and diced 1 celery rib, thinly sliced 4 cups homemade chicken stock or low-sodium chicken broth 2 cups diced butternut squash (about 10 ounces) One 28-ounce can chopped tomatoes (with juice) One 15-ounce can Great Northern beans, rinsed 2 teaspoons dried oregano 6 ounces baby spinach or arugula leaves Salt and a generous grinding of black pepper Shaved Vermont sharp Cheddar (optional) Heat the oil in a soup pot over medium heat. Add the sausage slices and cook until lightly browned....
We've gathered a handful of easy hors d'oeuvre ideas from FarmPlate friends and staffers. They're not so much recipes as guides for turning what you might find in the fridge or pantry into tempting treats to serve when people stop by. Grilled Veggie Rolls That panini pan you got from Santa also works well for grilling sliced vegetables! Slice eggplant or zucchini about ½-inch thick, brush with olive oil and grill until cooked through. Let cool slightly, sprinkle with crumbled Vermont Creamery's goat's milk feta and a pinch of dried thyme. Roll up and secure with a toothpick. Ohpah! Spinach-Artichoke Dip Heat a little olive oil in a skillet and cook 1 pound washed and trimmed spinach or...