baking

At FarmPlate, we are lucky to work in a place where going to farmers' markets, checking out pick-your-own berry patches and researching up and coming actors on the local food scene is just part of the job. One of our favorite local foods advocates is Hanna Robinson of HFR Living in New York City. Ms. Robinson is a natural foods chef and nutritional consulting who, along with numerous other ventures, keeps a wonderful blog full of seasonal recipes and interesting tips for anyone interested in eating and preparing healthy local food. This beautiful summer stone fruit tart recipe caught our eye, and Ms. Robinson has kindly allowed us to share it here with the rest of the FarmPlate community....
If you’ve been following my adventures on this blog, I’m happy to report that the taste of local grains didn’t disappoint. Grains caught my attention on a recent trip back home to Amherst, Massachusetts. I wanted to know more about the new generation of grain growers thriving in the Valley, and whether we’d be seeing more local wheat breads in the future. So I set out with a friend on a self-planned wheat tour in the Pioneer Valley. So far, we’ve met farmers successfully growing wheat, barley, rye and spelt (read about them here), buffed up on the history of wheat in the region and had our first tastes of dark round loaves made from local whole grains at the Hungry Ghost (read more ...
from the FarmPlate Kitchen Very rich and sure to become a classic on your Christmas table. For the shortbread: 1 cup King Arthur unbleached all-purpose flour ½ cup cornstarch ½ cup confectioners' sugar from the FarmPlate Kitchen Very rich and sure to become a classic on your Christmas table. For the shortbread: 1 cup King Arthur unbleached all-purpose flour ½ cup cornstarch ½ cup confectioners' sugar 1 stick cold unsalted butter, cut into cubes For the salted caramel: 1½ cups packed light brown sugar 1 cup Strafford Organic Creamery heavy cream 8 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened 1 teaspoon sea salt, such as French fleur de sel For the chocolate topping: 8 ounces dark chocolate (at...
from the FarmPlate Kitchen Follow Alison Lane's lead when baking homemade Stollen and do not use the nasty, colored candied citrus peel you see at the supermarket. La Cuisine in Alexandria, Virginia offers luscious candied citron sourced from an Italian specialist. King Arthur Flour sells lovely unsulfured and undyed candied citrus peels imported from Europe. 4 cups King Arthur unbleached all-purpose flour, divided1 envelope Rapid Rise instant dry yeast ½ teaspoon salt ½ cup warm milk ½ cup hot water 1 tablespoon honey 1 cup mixed diced candied citrus fruit—orange rind, lemon rind and/or citron 1 cup dark raisins ¼ cup dark rum 1/3 cup granulated sugar 1 large egg, beaten 1 tablespoon...
Some of our most cherished Christmas traditions are German in origin. Think Christmas trees, glass ornaments, Advent calendars, candy canes, spice cookies and Stollen, the fragrant, fruity bread that's a specialty of Dresden. Dresdeners don't hold back when it comes to their Stollen. Today and tomorrow, Dresden's master bakers will be putting the finishing touches on a two-ton, four-yard-long Stollen, readying the massive loaf for Saturday's Stollen Festival. The giant Stollen will be loaded onto a horse-drawn wagon to be paraded  through the city's Old Town on the way to the famed Christmas market. Apprentice baker and this year's Stollen maiden Claudia Rhumland will then raise the silver...
from the FarmPlate Kitchen If you plan on using homemade pumpkin purée in this recipe instead of canned, keep in mind that an average size pie pumpkin will yield between 3 and 4 cups of cooked purée. Store unused pumpkin purée in 1- or 2-cup quantities in the freezer. It will keep for several months. 1½ cups King Arthur white whole-wheat or unbleached all-purpose flour 1½ teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 2 teaspoons ground ginger ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves ¼ teaspoon salt 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature 2/3 cup Honey Gardens honey 1 large egg 1 cup (8 ounces) pumpkin purée (canned or from a cooked...
September is a honey of a month. The kids are back to school, the days are still warm and roadside stands are overflowing with nature's bounty. To top it off, it's Library Card Sign-up Month (time to check out a cookbook or two) and National Honey Month, sponsored by the National Honey Board, which was established by Congress in 1987 to support U.S. honey producers and encourage all of us to buy and use more honey. If you're looking for a special honey with a particular flavor, the National Honey Board website has a wonderful tool called the Honey Locator that lets you search for honey by flower source. From acacia to orange blossom to Yucatan varieties, you'll find honey from more than 170...
from Susan Stuck 6 to 8 just-ripe peaches from Shelburne Orchards 1½ cups King Arthur all-purpose flour 1¼ cups sugar, divided from Susan Stuck 6 to 8 just-ripe peaches from Shelburne Orchards 1½ cups King Arthur all-purpose flour 1¼ cups sugar, divided 1 stick Cabot unsalted butter A few drops pure almond extract or Amaretto di Saronno 1 cup Vermont heavy cream (try Strafford Dairy or Butterworks Farm) 4 egg yolks (try the free range eggs at Fair Winds Farm) Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Drop in the peaches and cook for 1 minute. Transfer to a bowl of ice water. Preheat the oven to 350ºF. In a medium bowl, blend together the flour and ¼ cup of the sugar. Work in the butter with a...
The shutters are off the camp windows, the lightning bugs will soon be out in full force and the lake temperature is already 58 degrees. The long days of summer are here. This is no time to be fussing with tricky or sticky pie dough. Yet there's a whole progression of summer fruits and berries to be picked, each one begging to be baked into pie. Right now there's rhubarb in the garden, and once that gets too woody the strawberries and cherries will be ripe and ready. Then raspberries, blueberries, blackberries and gooseberries come into play before the plums show up. A free-form tart, sometimes called crostata or galette, is the perfect way to show off summer's best, and it's quick to mix...
from the FarmPlate Kitchen Vermont has some of the tastiest, chewiest, crustiest, all-around best sandwich breads in the world. But a quality soft bun for your sliders is hard to find. We suggest baking your own buns and freezing them. This recipe is easy to double for a crowd. 3 cups King Arthur white whole-wheat flour 1½ cups King Arthur unbleached all-purpose flour 1 packet quick-rising yeast 1½ teaspoons salt 1½ cups whole milk 1/3 cup vegetable oil 2 large eggs 3 tablespoons brown sugar Egg wash made with 1 beaten egg white, 1 tablespoon water and a pinch of salt In a mixing bowl, whisk together the white whole-wheat flour, 1 cup of the all-purpose flour, the yeast and salt. Heat the...
by Vivian Stuck King Arthur's white whole-wheat flour ups the dietary fiber content yet still produces a tender crumb in this easy coffee cake. If you don't have any on hand, substitute all-purpose flour, not regular whole-wheat flour. Sliced rhubarb freezes well so you can enjoy this coffee cake all year long. 1 stick (8 tablespoons) unsalted butter 1 ½ cups sugar 2 large eggs 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract 1 ¼ cups all-purpose flour 1 cup King Arthur white whole-wheat flour 1 teaspoon baking soda Pinch of salt 1 cup sour cream or buttermilk 2 ½ cups diced rhubarb Topping ½ cup sugar ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Grease and flour a 9 x 13-inch baking pan. Cream...
Tom Kenyon of Aurora Farms, also in Charlotte, intends to bring wheat back to the Champlain Valley and has been collaborating with George to produce a red hard winter wheat. After two years of growing nothing but cattle feed, they found success this September when Champlain Valley Mills in Westport, NY, milled 3,000 pounds of flour from Aurora Farms wheat. "Being accustomed to baking with the finest organic wheat Kansas has to offer, I was hopeful that we could use a percentage of this Vermont wheat in some of our breads," said George. "Imagine my surprise when I combined this flour with water, yeast and salt in the mixing bowl and found that it made a familiar-feeling dough!  The...