dinner

On Saturday I picked up our very last CSA share of the season from one of our favorite local farms — a stellar little organic operation called Your Farm. We typically pick up our share boxes at the Norwich Farmers' Market, however, the market schedule has trickled down to a once-per-month affair, so this week we made the one-hour trek up to Fairlee, Vermont, to collect our bi-weekly bag of veggies. Your Farm is located right on the beautiful Vermont bank of the Connecticut River, where hills roll and river breezes blow. Farmers Kevin and Laura Channell run a tight ship. The quality of their products is top-notch and we are never disappointed with flavor or freshness....
from the FarmPlate Kitchen The Sardinian pasta called fregola looks a little like rough semolina-dusted buckshot. It's chewy, tasty and absolutely wonderful. You can find it at some specialty food markets or order it from ChefShop. 2 acorn squash, split in half lengthwise and seeded2/3 cup fregola Sarda (traditional Sardinian pasta) or Israeli couscous2 tablespoons unsalted butter¼ cup currants or raisins½ cup apple cider2 tablespoons olive oil1 medium red onion, chopped1 celery rib, cut into small dice1 carrot, cut into small dice1 or 2 ripe tomatoes, chopped1 tablespoon ras el hanout spice blend¼ cup half-dried homegrown tomatoes, chopped2 tablespoons pine nuts Preheat...
from the FarmPlate Kitchen Ingredients:1 pound rotini or other sturdy pasta shape2 tablespoons chopped unsalted pistachios 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 scallions, thinly sliced12 ounces baby spinach leaves About 1 cup slow-roasted cherry tomatoes Salt and black pepper 4 ounces feta, crumbledA handful of Italian parsley leaves, chopped Cook the pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water. While the pasta is cooking, heat a skillet over medium heat. Toast the pistachios in the hot dry skillet for a minute or two—no longer. Remove from the pan. Heat the oil in the skillet and cook the scallions until soft, about two minutes. Add the spinach and cook just to wilt. Add the tomatoes and...
From the FarmPlate Kitchen IngredientsAbout 6 pounds ripe red tomatoes 1 small watermelon, such as 'Moon & Stars' or 'Sugar Baby' 2 cucumbers 2 small onions, minced 1 red bell pepper, trimmed, seeded and cut into small dice ½ cup minced fresh parsley ¼ cup rice vinegar or other mild vinegar ¼ cup good olive oil Juice of 1 lemon 2 tablespoons Absolut Citron (optional) Salt and freshly ground black pepper 1 or 2 dashes Spanish smoked paprika Method1. Peel and seed the tomatoes. When tomatoes are truly ripe, they're easy to peel with a sharp paring knife. Or, cut an X on the bottom of the tomatoes, drop into boiling water for no more than 30 seconds. Rinse with cold water, then peel...
Happy New Year from everyone at FarmPlate! We have compiled a few special recipes to help you kick off this new year with cooking that celebrates seasonal, local ingredients, healthy eating and winter comfort. If all five of us were to gather in one place for a potluck, with a single course assigned to each staff member, this is the kind of meal we would enjoy together. We hope you'll also enjoy these recipes—and, of course, source the ingredients from farmers and artisans near you. Cheers! THE APPETIZER • Jeff's Choice WARM BRIE WITH FOREST MUSHROOMS & SAGEfrom The FarmPlate Kitchen1     wheel of Sandwich Creamery brie1     shallot, thinly...
No, we're not talking about getting friendly with a lake monster here. This "champ" is the classic mash-up of potatoes and green onions and it hails from Northern Ireland, not the ice-cold depths of Lake Champlain. The dish is a champion among winter warmers for its simplicity, frugality and rib-sticking goodness. We're depending on our cheesy champ to top a meaty shepherd's pie, but champ is equally happy as a side dish to accompany roasts, stews and chili. Floury baking potatoes are a first choice here, but all-purpose and waxy potatoes will work well too. Your beverage options are wide open to serve with this hearty dish. McNeill's Champ Ale is a natural. Cider -- hard or soft -- is a...
Some might call it a gastronomic convergence. All week long we can expect an exceptional alignment of vegetables at produce stands across northern New England. Uber-ripe tomatoes, heavenly melons, red-as-Mars peppers, onions so sweet they don't bring tears to your eyes . . . they're all piled high and waiting for the right person to unlock their true potential.Some might call it a gastronomic convergence. All week long we can expect an exceptional alignment of vegetables at produce stands across northern New England. Uber-ripe tomatoes, heavenly melons, red-as-Mars peppers, onions so sweet they don't bring tears to your eyes . . . they're all piled high and waiting for the right person to...
from Chef Jason Lawless, The Woodstock Inn, Woodstock, VT 2 tablespoons butter Four 10-ounce organic Misty Knoll chicken breasts About 1 quart plain yogurt One 2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and thinly sliced from Chef Jason Lawless, The Woodstock Inn, Woodstock, VT 2 tablespoons butter Four 10-ounce organic Misty Knoll chicken breasts About 1 quart plain yogurt One 2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and thinly sliced 2 stalks fresh lemongrass, tough outer leaves removed and cut into 1-inch pieces 1 bunch fresh lemon verbena, finely chopped 2 medium heirloom tomatoes, sliced 1/4-inch thick ¼ cup pure Vermont maple syrup (try syrup from Kedron Sugarmakers) Chopped fresh basil leaves for...
They're starting to pile up everywhere. Tomatoes on the counter, tomatoes on the kitchen table, tomatoes lined up on the windowsill, tomatoes on the vine waiting to be picked. It's a wonderful problem. If I were a better person, I'd be canning tomatoes all night long but I'd rather be outside watching the Perseid meteor shower for the next few nights. Plus I could never beat the intense flavor of Muir Glen's organic fire-roasted tomatoes, so I don't even try. To concentrate and preserve all that August tomato goodness, I turn my oven to 250ºF and start lining baking sheets (with sides) with parchment paper to get ready to slow-bake my tomato harvest. The smallest cherry tomatoes require...
When pesto first showed up on the American foodie scene in the late '70s, everybody started growing basil and making pesto. It became a rite of summer, up there with ballpark hot dogs, campfire s'mores and lemonade stands. Pesto's popularity soon rivaled that of tabbouleh at potluck buffets nationwide. Everyone had the recipe, it was right there on page 80 of the Silver Palate Cookbook. Best of all, pasta with pesto was a great, cheap way to feed a lot of people. True pesto cognoscenti have always made their pesto with pignoli aka pine nuts, not the walnuts suggested by the Rosso/Lukins duo. But the price of a pound of pine nuts has recently rocketed past $23. Ouch. I'd always found walnuts...
from the FarmPlate Kitchen 1 pound zucchini, cut into ½-inch cubes Salt and freshly ground black pepper A handful of fresh parsley leaves 2 cloves garlic 4 tablespoons olive oil 1 large sweet onion, thinly sliced A big pinch of chopped fresh thyme from the FarmPlate Kitchen 1 pound zucchini, cut into ½-inch cubes Salt and freshly ground black pepper A handful of fresh parsley leaves 2 cloves garlic 4 tablespoons olive oil 1 large sweet onion, thinly sliced A big pinch of chopped fresh thyme 4 large Vermont eggs (try farm-fresh eggs from Berway Farm and Creamery) 1 tablespoon unsalted butter Spread out the cubed zucchini, sprinkle with salt and set aside. Chop the parsley and garlic...
It's that time of year. It's hot and humid and gardens are going bonkers. All across the country, men and women are walking into offices with armloads of cucumbers and zucchini cheerily telling their co-workers to help themselves to their backyard harvest. This is one gift horse you really need to examine carefully. Push aside the three-pound cucumbers and the zucchinis as big as biceps. These cucurbits on steroids are often watery, spongy and bordering on flavorless. Try to select compact specimens that feel heavy for their size and have dark green skins. Zucchini enthusiasts love to grate the maxi-zukes for making zucchini bread. In fact, a quick Google search for a z-bread recipe...
from Sugarsnap, Burlington, Vermont 2 large zucchini One 8 ounce container of pesto (homemade or purchased) ½ cup pine nuts or nuts of your choice 3+ tablespoons Parmigiano Reggiano or other hard Italian cheese Juice and zest of 1 lemon Salt and pepper Wash and dry the zucchini and using a julienne peeler, make the “linguini“ using the white flesh and skin of the squash, stopping when you get to the seeds. In a bowl large enough to toss the mix, add pesto (to taste), nuts, half of the cheese and the lemon zest. Use lemon juice to thin the pesto as you would use hot pasta water in a hot pesto/pasta dish. Add salt and pepper and more or less of anything as you wish. Top each serving with some...
Waterbury, Vermont's Hen of the Wood restaurant is busy making room in its wine cellar for the delivery of some out-of-the-ordinary Oregon wines. Anne Amie Vineyards, the Willamette Valley winery best known for its world-class Pinot Noirs, has collaborated with the restaurant to release two private label bottlings of its Pinot Noir red and Müller-Thurgau white. (Shred heads and wine lovers alike will appreciate the new Anne Amie/Hen of the Wood release. Stowe's Lance [caption id="attachment_3278" align="alignleft" width="231" caption="Wine Label Designed by Lance Violette"][/caption] Violette, best known for his graphic work on Shaun White's most recent medal-winning snowboard, designed the...
There's an awfully good chance you'll be in shirtsleeves while shopping for the ingredients for this Sunday's Easter feast. With temperatures forecast in the 70s, warm sunny thoughts and flavors will be on everyone's mind. Even if you're planning on roasting a succulent Vermont leg of lamb or a delicious ham, you might want to include a vegetarian entrée on the menu. Hortapita is a traditional Greek savory pie made with wild greens gathered in the springtime that's often part of a Greek Easter meal. While you can't go foraging on a Vermont hillside just yet, you can find tender local greens at area co-ops and farmers' markets (Middlebury, Montpelier and Rutland's farmers' markets will be...