meat

Once upon a time, there were carnivores and vegetarians, and they ruled the gastronomic globe. Either you ate meat or you didn’t; there were hardly any other choices. If you felt queasy about factory farms, you either opted out of meat altogether or you ate meat that didn’t match your morals.  But now, thanks to some creative thinking and a rise in small-scale farms, an eater can choose from a number of “third ways” of eating meat. They can be a flexitarian, a pesecetarian, or the latest “arian” to come on the scene:  a humaneitarian – a person who eats meat only if it’s been humanely raised. Humaneitarians are motivated by their concern for farm animals. They figure out what “...
A great piece on NorthJersey.com offers all sorts of advice for those of us mourning the decreased connection to our food during the winter months.  Elisa Ung, the Record’s restaurant reviewer, encourages readers to seek out a local winter farmers’ market and connect with their nearby Slow Food chapter. And instead of succumbing to the winter doldrums, it’s important to focus on finding sources of local eggs, meat, and seafood (click the links to search in your area). Even if you don’t have the time, surely some of the great local farm-to-table chefs do. Of course, we think the easiest way to find great local food is to search FarmPlate.com.   Here are a few of the specific...
"The food safety system in the U.S. is underfunded, overwhelmed, and in desperate need of new powers to keep us safe as Americans," said Illinois senator Dick Durbin at a Chicago grocery store last weekend, according to ABC News. Durbin is the sponsor for the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (S. 510) that will be debated by the full U.S. Senate as early as next week. Durbin's assessment of the food system is unfortunately quite accurate. Andrew Kimbrell, the Center for Food Safety's executive director, writes on the Huffington Post, "70 million Americans are sickened, 300,000 are hospitalized, and 5,000 die from food-borne illness every year." The Food Modernization Bill would expand the...
Spring is only three weeks away--at least for the savvy Vermonters who've already signed up for their Spring Localvore Share from Pete's Greens' Good Eats CSA. Pete Johnson, the Pete in Pete's Greens, is a rock star among New England organic famers, and his year-round CSA concept is spreading across the country. By growing salad greens in unheated, movable greenhouses on his 230-acre farm in Craftsbury, Johnson has made fresh local produce a cold-season reality here. Johnson is one of “a critical mass of new, innovative farmers” at the heart of “a massive wave of change,” says Dave Rogers, national policy director of NOFA (the Northeast Organic Farmers Association). The Spring Localvore...