The Farmplate Blog

It's that very special time we wait for all year- tomato season. What to do with your bountiful harvest? Roast them! Image from Smitten Kitchen SLOW-ROASTED TOMATOESadapted from Smitten Kitchen Cherry, grape, or small Roma tomatoesWhole cloves of garlic, unpeeledOlive OilSalt and pepper (optional)Rosemary, thyme or other herbs (optional) Preheat over to 225°F. Halve the tomatoes and arrange on a parchment-lined baking sheet with the garlic. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with herbs, salt and pepper, if desired. Bake the tomatoes for about three hours. They should be wrinkled and dry, but with a bit of juice on the inside. Let cool and eat right away or preserve them by immersing them...
Fruits, vegetables and other healthy snack options are often woefully absent from schools. Vending machines and snack bars are stocked with foods void of essentail nutrients and that are laden with sugar and hydrogenated fats. The USDA recently finalized standards for school snacks that will go into effect for 2014-2015. The Kids’ Safe and Healthful Foods Project (a collaboration between The Pew Charitable Trusts and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation) called this "an important step for improving kids' health" and went on to say, “The next vital part of the process is for districts to begin implementing these standards. The guidelines established by USDA serve as a baseline—states and...
Anne Myer wants kids to love what they're eating. Her blog, Teach Eat Love, was chosen as Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution blog of the month for June. Her ten tips for raising a better eater encourage parents to get their kids involved in the cooking process. "I vividly remember thinking something had to change when I was stuck in rush hour traffic for the sole purpose of buying cheddar crackers, one of the few things that my picky toddler would eat. From then on, I started limiting snacks as a reward or when my little girl was fussy. I began reading about how to help my daughter move from processed snack foods to real, whole foods and quickly realized that we needed to make some changes...
Usher in summer with homemade popsicles! There's no need to go out and get high fructose corn syrup-laden store-bought popsicles with no trace of real fruit. Healthy, local fruit popsicles are a cinch to make! All you need is some fresh farmers' market fruit and a popsicle mold.* Image from This Rawsome Vegan Life HOMEMADE LOCAL FRUIT POPSICLESadapted from This Rawsome Vegan Life 1 3/4 cup milk (the original recipe calls for 1 can of coconut milk, but you could try yogurt, local raw milk, or even homemade nut milk!)1/4 cup raw cane sugar (or other sweetener, try local honey or maple syrup!)Assorted fresh, local fruitOptional: Finely chopped mint, lavendar, basil or other herb of choice...
The precipitous decline of bee populations isn't groundbreaking news. It is, however, startling to see exactly how it would impact daily life. Whole Foods recently pulled produce off the shelves to illustrate just how much would disappear without any bees to pollinate the plants. Whole Foods explains: "One of every three bites of food comes from plants pollinated by honeybees and other pollinators. Yet, major declines in bee populations threaten the availability of many fresh ingredients consumers rely on for their dinner tables. To raise awareness of just how crucial pollinators are to our food system, the University Heights Whole Foods Market store temporarily removed all produce that...